Restore.

Chambers, Murphy & Burge prepared the Historic Structures Report that led to a five-year restoration of this significant Frank Lloyd Wright design. The 4,435 square-foot residence, altered and subdivided into apartments and over the years, was barely recognizable

CMB teamed with Schooley Caldwell Associates to restore the house. Beginning with emergency stabilization and restoring the custom clay tile roof, the home was meticulously restored to the museum / education center it is today. Missing elements such as Wright designed furniture, reflecting pool and historic landscape elements were re-created from historic drawings and photographs.

Westcott

Before

Westcott

After

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Burton J. Westcott House is the only Prairie School era commission designed by Wright in Ohio. Wright designed the home for Burton and his wife Orpha in 1908. Wright’s client was an early car manufacturer at the cutting edge of technology. Westcott’s progressive nature is reflected in the garage, a combination stable and garage (Wright’s Robie House, built in 1909, was previously believed to be his first to incorporate a garage).

The windows used at the Westcott House are unique from Wright’s other houses; they are larger than most (if not all) of his other works, and the grid pattern with clear glass and absence of leading evoke Japanese influence. The interior spaces feature Wright’s signature details, such as built-in furnishings, horizontal wood trim lines and art glass.

Evident in several features that Wright’s design was influenced by his first trip to Japan in 1905, Wright himself considered the project an important design commission. He selected it to be included in the first monograph of his best designs, Studies and Executed Buildings of Frank Lloyd Wright, known commonly as “The Wasmuth Portfolio.”

Westcott

Historic

Westcott

After

Chambers, Murphy & Burge worked together with the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy and the Westcott House Foundation during the extensive restoration of the structure. A historic structures report and a feasibility study were completed prior to the restoration. Completed in three phases, the restoration included structural stabilization, a new roof, stucco and window restoration, mechanical and electrical system replacement, interior restoration, art glass restoration, and the addition of interpretive furnishings.

The restoration team encountered many challenges throughout the project. Little information was found on how the house was actually built; the team based design decisions on physical evidence and information available at the time but had to adjust strategy as elements were uncovered and new information was evident.

Westcott

Historic

Westcott

After

After restoring the brick and stone work by gently removing paint and re-painting the masonry, a standing seam metal roof to replace the old enhanced the buildings industrial persona. The remaining original windows and doors were restored, including one metal plated fire shutter and two bead board doors. The wood floors were restored along with the deteriorating wood structural elements.

Westcott

Historic

Westcott

After

New MEP services included the following: water service meters, plumbing distribution, and fixtures; electrical service meters, power distribution and fixtures; and, simple, contemporary lighting fixtures compatible with the industrial character of the building; HVAC system.

Services Provided:

  • Lead Historical Architect
  • Historic Structures Report
  • Feasibility Study
  • Design & Restoration
  • Historic Tax Credits
  • Save America’s Treasures Grant
  • Museum Quality Restoration