Leadership

Elizabeth Corbin Murphy, FAIA and Lauren Pinney Burge, AIA have managed the Chambers, Murphy & Burge Studio since 1993.

Lauren Pinney Burge, AIA – Principal

Profile

Leading her to contribute to the National Park Service Preservation Brief #47, Lauren’s expertise in Cyclical Maintenance Planning is evidenced at the Historic Ford Houses. Lecturing also on the care of Frank Lloyd Wright homes, Lauren was Principal and Project Architect for the four phases of work at the Westcott House, Frank Lloyd Wright’s only Prairie Style House in Ohio.

Lauren received the Wright Spirit Award, has been a juried exhibitor at “Contemporary Works of Faith (Liturgical Art Guild), and received an AIA Ohio Design Award for the Restoration of St. Mary Church. A current member of the AIA National Historic Resource Committee, she will serve as Chair in 2019. Lauren is a peer reviewer for the Association for Preservation Technology Internationals scholarly journal, The Bulletin.

Elizabeth Corbin Murphy, FAIA – Principal

Philosophy

Elizabeth is an accomplished architect dedicated solely to preservation, restoration, and adaptive use technology and design. She consults with building owners and architects regarding state and federal rehabilitation tax credits, design related to old or historic structures, detailed restoration specifications, historic interiors and design guidelines for historic urban centers.

Elizabeth is the 2012 recipient of the AIA Ohio Gold Medal, the highest state honor bestowed on an individual architect. She is past chair of the Advisory Group for the American Institute of Architects National Committee on Historic Resources and a Professional Peer for the GSA Design Excellence and First Impressions Programs. She has served on several design awards juries, is past president of AIA Ohio and a board member of the Cleveland Restoration Society. As a Professor of Practice at Kent State University College of Architecture & Environmental Design, Elizabeth has guided several teams of students to be honored by the Charles E. Peterson Prize for the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS).